Blogging as an extension of the art of printing

To govern men is not as high a sphere of action as is generally
imagined. Any one can do it, who can write, print, and circulate his
opinions. An obscure individual, dwelling in a garret, or in a cave, if
you please, can send forth opinions, which shall shake down thrones and
even empires in the dust. The mightiest revolutions, in religion,
politics, science and literature, (since the discovery of the art of
printing, the mariner’s compass, and the late improvements affecting
the social intercourse of mankind,) have been effected by humble
individuals, and by the humble means I have referred to above. Such a
man, by his writings, may change the face of the whole world, in any
one of many ways:–by introducing new modes of agriculture, new modes
of navigation–by introducing new tactics, or new weapons of warfare
into our navies and armies. Any new idea, on any subject, useful to
man, once laid before the world, through the press, no matter how
humble its author, or where he lives, almost instantly spreads far and
wide–crosses every sea and every ocean–ascends every mountain’s
height–dives down into the bowels of the earth, and finally pervades
every portion of the habitable globe. Who would not covet such a power
as this! The art of printing has given an author these vast means of
doing either good or harm in the world.

WRITINGS OF CALEB ATWATER.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, CITY OF WASHINGTON
COLUMBUS.  PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR. PRINTED BY SCOTT AND WRIGHT. 1833

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